Health Conditions

Acid Reflux

Acne

Age Spots

Allergies

Alopecia Areata

Anemia

Antibiotics & Antiseptics (Natural)

Asthma

Athlete's Foot (Tinea Pedis)

Bad Breath

Baldness

Bedbugs

Blood Clots

Blood Pressure

Body Odor

Boils

BPH - Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Bronchitis

Brown Spots (Liver Spots)

Bruises

Bruxism

Burning Mouth Syndrome

Burns

Bursitis

Candida

Canker Sores

Celiac Disease

Cellulite

Cellulitis

Chemotherapy & Radiation Aids

Cholesterol

Colds and Flu

Cold Sores (Herpes)

Colitis

Conjunctivitis

Constipation

COPD

Corns

Coughs

Cramps (Muscle)

Cuts & Wounds

Dandruff

Dermatitis (Contact & Irritant)

Diabetes

Diarrhea

Digestion

Dry Eyes Syndrome

Dry Skin

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)
Estrogen Dominance

Fever

Fibrocystic Breasts

Flesh Eating Bacteria (Necrotizing Fasciitis)

Flu

Food Poisoning

Foot & Heel Problems

Foot Odor

Frostbite

Fungal Nail Infections

Gas

GERD

Gingivitis (Periodontal Disease)

Gluten Intolerance

Gout

Grave's Disease

Hair, Damaged (Split Ends)

Hair Loss

Hands (Cold)

Hands (Sweaty)

Hangover

Headache

Head Lice

Heartburn

Hemorrhoids

Herpes (Cold Sores)

Hiccups

Hirsutism (Excess Hair)

Hives (Urticaria)

Hoarseness

Hyperhidrosis (Increased Sweating)

Hypertension

Hyperthyroidism

Hypothyroidism

Impetigo

Insect Stings & Bites

Intertrigo

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Irritated Eyes

Itchy Skin (Pruritus)

Jet Lag

Jock Itch (tinea cruris)

Laryngitis

Leg Cramps

Lice

Liver Spots

Lyme Disease

Melasma

Menstruation

Moles

Molluscum Contagiosum

Morning Sickness (Nausea & Motion)

Motion Sickness (Nausea & Morning)

MRSA

Nail Health

Nail Infections

Nail Inflammation (Paronychia)

Nausea, Morning & Motion Sickness

Night Sweats

Nosebleeds

Otitis Media (Ear Infection)

Pelvic Pain

Periodontal Disease (Gingivitis)

Perioral Dermatitis

Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)

Pityriasis Rosea

Poison Ivy & Poison Oak

Prostate - BPH

Psoriasis

Radiation

Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

Ringworm (Tinea)

Rosacea

Scabies

Shingles (Herpes Zoster)

Sinusitis

Skin (Dry)

Skin (Losing Pigment)

Smell & Taste (Loss)

Sore Throat

Spider Veins

Sprains

Stretch Marks (Striae)

Sunburn

Swimmer's Ear

Tendinitis

Thyroid

Tinea (Ringworm)

Tinea Versicolor

Tongue Health

Toothache

Tremor

Upset Stomach

Varicose Veins

Vitiligo

Warts

Weight Loss

Wounds & Cuts

Yeast Infections (Candida)


Health Categories
Health Products
Health Articles
Health911 Dermatology

 

Online eNewsletter

Click here to sign-up for the Health911 eNewsletter that includes information about seasonal health conditions, links to our latest articles, alerts to our monthly product specials, health tips, and wellness programs. Sign-up today!


Make a Suggestion!
Share your health and wellness suggestions.  We want to build the Health911 community around the interests of our viewers and customers. Click here

Hoarseness

Causes
Tips
Remedies
 


Causes

Yelling, singing or speaking for a long time, or a cold are some of the causes of hoarseness and laryngitis. The end result is an inflammation of the larynx or the muscles in or around it, which interferes with proper functioning of the vocal cords. Yelling or speaking may cause a spasm of one of the vocal cords which will cause the voice to become deep and raspy. Hoarseness is the next step in the progression. Treating the parathyroid glands and any phosphorus/calcium imbalance will often correct this problem. The parathyroid glands produce a hormone that helps regulate the calcium levels in your blood. Without going into too much detail here, if there is too much phosphorus in your body, the parathyroid hormone causes a release of calcium from your bones in an attempt to balance the two minerals.

Smoking is a major cause of hoarseness. Smoke irritates the mucous membranes and vocal cords. Dust and strong vapors are additional possibilities.

A cold may give you laryngitis, which sometimes prevents you from speaking at all. Avoid raising your voice to be heard, for instance to overcome outside noise, traffic, kids yelling, etc., as your voice isn't accustomed to it.

A very dry environment may affect your throat, so drink plenty of fluids to keep your throat moist. Jet planes, very dry climates and many homes in the winter are examples. If you are in a place where you can add moisture, such as home or office, by all means use a humidifier to increase the relative humidity.

One overlooked cause of hoarseness is GERD or Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease. Researchers have found that many cases of adult asthma and hoarseness are caused by the regurgitation of stomach juices into the throat and lungs. If you are suffering from heartburn or digestive problems and are hoarse, work on improving the digestive imbalance and the hoarseness should go away, too.

An underlying medical problem can also be the cause. If your hoarseness persists for more than a few days, have your doctor check your throat. You may have a strep infection or some sort of growth on your vocal cords or larynx.

Many people who speak a lot develop hoarseness. We have found a product that may be of help - "Throat Coat," an herbal tea preparation. This tea was used during the 1996 presidential campaigns of both Bob Dole and Bill Clinton, who proclaimed that it was a big help.

Caution: Seek medical attention if your condition lasts longer than two weeks.

Tips

Don't talk, as this will strain your vocal cords even more.

Remedies

Folk

Apple cider vinegar For laryngitis a folk remedy from Vermont uses one teaspoon of apple cider vinegar to half glass of water, taken every hour for seven hours.

Cayenne pepper Pour one cup of boiling water into a cup; add 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper and a few drops of lemon juice; stir and sip slowly; the hotter the better.

DMSO Gargling with DMSO will relieve the symptoms of laryngitis.

Essential oils Boil a pot of water and remove from the stove. Add: 2 drops chamomile essential oil, 3 drops lavender essential oil and 2 drops thyme essential oil. Make a tent over your head and the pot and inhale.

Ginger Peel the skin from a small ginger root. Slice the root into thin coins and place the pieces into a small pot of water. Boil the pieces to make tea. The tea should turn a yellowish (straw) or tan color. Add three tablespoons of your favorite honey to sweeten the tea. Sip the hot tea slowly. The tea gives a sharp tingle to the throat after swallowing it. After you sip it, gently clear your throat.This tea also works for trying to get your voice back after a cold. This remedy compliments of Cathy Ekaitis.

Honey/lemon A mixture of honey and lemon makes a good gargle and is very soothing for the throat.

Ice Suck on a piece of ice. It will stop spasms in your throat.

Lozenges Suck on lozenges periodically throughout the day to moisten your throat.

Onion syrup Another excellent gargle is made from onion syrup, honey and lemon. To make the onion syrup: slice three large onions and put them in four or five cups of water; simmer until syrupy; strain. Next, put five or six tablespoonsful of the syrup into a glass of warm water, along with a tablespoon of honey and a dash of lemon. Sip slowly.

Sea salt Make a gargle of sea salt and water and use several times a day.

Tea Try one of these tea remedies:

  • Teas made from fenugreek, eucalyptus, horehound and marshmallow also can be used as a gargle.
  • Combine one teaspoon each of valerian root, skullcap and catnip with one cup of boiling water; steep for 10 minutes; sip while still hot.
  • Any hot tea will stimulate the throat and help relax the vocal cords.

Zinc Suck on zinc lozenges to ease throat discomfort.  

Recommended Products

Recommended Products

©1998-2012 Health911 Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Disclaimer: Health911 Media, Inc., Health911.com, and any emails you receive from this website, provides health, fitness and nutritional information. This information is designed for educational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a health problem, condition or disease, or use it as a substitute for any medication or other treatment therapy. The statements provided with any product on this web site have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other health-care professional. Some of the health imagery courtesy of Wikipedia.